Read the February 2013 edition of construct, our bi-monthly newsletter, here.

There’s news about two schemes we were awarded through the JV North contractors framework, a newt story from Laneside Quarry, and an article about driving that might give you something to think about.

Happy reading!

If you are viewing via ipad or iphone and cannot view the publication above, you can download the pdf here (0.7Mb)

 

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Craig AshtonGetting your vehicle winter ready

Blog post by Craig Ashton, Casey Fleet Manager

 

 

 

 

Traffic in winter

Make sure your vehicle is ready for the winter

The chilly and wet weather over the past week is a sure indicator that winter is here.

Three of the last four winters have seen widespread snow and ice for weeks on end, with temperatures regularly below zero.  Making sure your vehicle is ready for the conditions can save you time, money and possibly your life.

You are more likely to break down in a bad winter, so here are some tips to help you reduce that risk, make sure you are equipped for the conditions, and make your journey safer.

The chilly and wet weather over the past week is a sure indicator that winter is here.  Three of the last four winters have seen widespread snow and ice for weeks on end, with temperatures regularly below zero.  Making sure your vehicle is ready for the conditions can save you time, money and possibly your life.

You are more likely to break down in a bad winter, so here are some tips to help you reduce that risk, make sure you are equipped for the conditions, and make your journey safer.

Check your vehicle

  • Tyre condition:  Tyres, including the spare, must be above 1.6mm tread depth across the centre three quarters of the tread.  Check for bulges or damage that may expose the cord and check for cuts or tears.
  • Tyre pressure:  Make sure all tyres are correctly inflated to the manufacturer’s recommendations.  These can be found in the vehicle manual and on most vehicles inside the fuel flap.
  • Windscreen wipers:  Make sure that windscreen and rear wipers, if fitted, clear the screen fully and check for signs of splitting or tearing of the rubber.
  • Windscreen washers:  Make sure your washers are in full working order and that none of the jets are blocked.  Use windscreen washer concentrate to prevent the fluid from freezing.
  • Lights:  Check operation and condition of all lamps.  Replace any blown bulbs and check that there is no white light visible from rear lamps except reversing lights.
  • Mirrors:  Check condition of glass and operation.
  • Antifreeze:  Check coolant level regularly and, if required, top up with a mixture of the correct type of antifreeze.
  • Fuel:  Ensure you always have at least a quarter tank in case of unexpected delays.
  • Locks and door seals:  Stop doors freezing shut with a thin coat of polish or Vaseline on rubber door seals.  A squirt of WD-40 in locks will help stop them freezing.

 

Year round essentials

  • Fully charged mobile phone and in-car charger.
  • Sunglasses to deal with glare from sun or snow.
  • Warning triangle.
  • Road atlas or sat-nav.
  • A breakdown membership card is always useful.

 

Winter essentials

  • Blanket, org or sleeping bag.
  • Shovel.
  • Bits of carpet or thick cardboard to help wheels regain traction on ice or snow.
  • Salt, sand or cat litter to help clear snow and ice.
  • Ice scraper and de-icer.
  • Torch and batteries.
  • Tow rope.
  • Battery jump leads.
  • Snacks – chocolate or cereal bars.
  • Extra screen wash and bottled water.

 

If you are planning a journey when bad weather is forecast, make sure you take a warm winter coat, scarf, hat and gloves, waterproofs, sturdy boots and a flask of hot drink.

Hopefully you won’t need them, but if you do, you’ll be very glad of them!

More information is available from http://www.theaa.com/motoring_advice/seasonal/winter_motoring.html

Safe driving!

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Read the November 2013 edition of construct, our bi-monthly newsletter, here.

There’s news about two fantastic projects we are carrying out in Leicester – both with a royal link,  a welfare article about men’s health, and some tips if you find your home needs brightening up after all the Christmas decorations come down.

Happy reading!

If you are viewing via ipad or iphone and cannot view the publication above, you can download the pdf here (0.5Mb)

 

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Read the September 2013 edition of construct, our bi-monthly newsletter, here.

If you’re interested in history, there’s a great article about Castlefied, Manchester.

Happy reading!

If you are viewing via ipad or iphone and cannot view the publication above, you can download the pdf here (1Mb)

 

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Read the May 2013 edition of construct, our bi-monthly newsletter, here.

This edition contains great article about the evolution of our Land Reclamation division over the past 5 years.

Happy reading!

If you are viewing via ipad or iphone and cannot view the publication above, you can download the pdf here (2Mb)

 

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Read the March 2013 edition of construct, our bi-monthly newsletter, here.

This edition contains an important announcement from our Chairman, Peter Casey, plus information about recent successes for our Building division.

We also have a feature about our Plant Hire division.

Happy reading!

If you are viewing via ipad or iphone and cannot view the publication above, you can download the pdf here (1.75Mb)

 

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If you cannot see the newsletter because you are viewing via ipad, you can download it here Construct Jan 2013 (pdf – 1.8Mb)

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If you cannot see the newsletter because you are viewing via ipad, you can download it here (pdf – 1.9Mb)

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If you cannot see the newsletter because you are viewing via ipad, you can download the pdf (pdf – 550kb)
You can read older editions of construct  here 
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Casey staff along with Trainers from HearFirst

At the end of August, we held an Introduction to British Sign Language one-day course at our offices in Rochdale.

The course, held by HearFirst, was a fun day that  didn’t just teach us some basic sign language that was relevant to what we do, but also made us aware of the things we need to think about when dealing with and communicating with people who are deaf or hard of hearing.

We realised that there were some really practical considerations to take into account and we thought we’d share some of what we learned.

 

What is British Sign Language (BSL)?

BSL is a living language (meaning it is still evolving just as English is), used by about 100,000 deaf people in Britain.  It is also used by hearing people to communicate with deaf people, and by BSL interpreters.

It is a visual gestural, language in terms of both its production and perception.  Body and head posture, facial expression and lip movements all play a distinctive role in contributing to meaning.  As with English, there are some regional variations—a sign used in Manchester might be different to the sign used in London.

Sign language is not a literal translation of English—it has its own grammar, contexts and rules.  Generally, not so many words are used to make up a sentence and they may be placed in a different order to English.  Because of this, some deaf people may have some difficulty understanding written text.

So, what are the practical issues?

Things to Know:

  • Sign language is not another form of English; it is an official language with its own grammar, contexts and rules.
  • Lip reading, while helpful, is only 30%-50% effective, and sometimes less.
  • Long conversations can be very fatiguing to the person who is lip-reading.
  • Not all persons who are deaf use sign language.
  • Not all persons who are deaf write and read.
  • Not all persons who are deaf speak.
  • Not all persons who are deaf lip-read.

Things to Do:

  • Find out how the person best communicates.
  • If the person uses an interpreter, address the person, not the interpreter.
  • If the person reads lips, speak in a normal, not exaggerated way. Short, simple sentences are best.
  • If the person lip-reads, ensure that your face is in a good light.
  • Gain their attention before starting a conversation.
  • If there is some doubt in your mind whether they understood you correctly, rephrase your statement and ask them if you have been understood.
  • Try to use an expressive face

Things to Avoid:

  • Do not become impatient or exasperated with the person if it takes longer to communicate.
  • Make sure there are no physical barriers between you.  Face the deaf person at all times..
  • If the person is using hearing aids, avoid conversations in large, open and noisy surroundings. Do not shout but speak clearly and try to remove the background noise.  Hard flooring and bare walls cause reverberation and echo.  Carpets and soft furnishings help to absorb unwanted sounds.

Things to Consider:

  • Persons who may deal very well one-on-one in communication may have a hard time with two or more speakers, especially if there are many interruptions and interjections.
  • Showing impatience to someone who is deaf or hearing impaired may cause the less assertive to back off from telling you of their needs.
  • When someone asks, “What did you say?”, repeat your question. The answers, “Never mind,” “Nothing,” or “It’s not important,” can imply that the person is not worth repeating yourself for.
  • Make sure you have good signage and visual information—if you want people to know about it, make sure they can see it.
  • Make sure the deaf person knows what you are talking about—it will help them anticipate the likely vocabulary.  Let them know if you are going to change the subject.

Working with Interpreters:

When working with interpreters, there are some practical considerations that should be taken into account to ensure that you get the best from the session.

Preparation  It is beneficial to send any relevant papers or materials to the Interpreter at least one or two weeks before the assignment.  On late bookings, emailing or faxing the information will still be beneficial.  Be aware that the Interpreter will be impartial throughout the assignment.

Briefing  Fifteen minutes before the assignment begins, hold a short briefing with the Interpreter to go through the events or topics that need translating.  Also use this time to arrange positioning of bodies and the use of lighting.  If any handouts are being distributed, ensure the Interpreter has a copy as they may need to refer to them.

Breaks   The job of an Interpreter is both physically and mentally challenging, due to the nature of their role.  Breaks should be scheduled roughly every half hour, but this can vary depending on the Interpreter’s experience.  If an assignment is expected to last over two hours, you may need to book two interpreters.  You can ask advice on how many you will need.

Positioning   When positioning the Interpreter, ask the deaf person their preference.  Usually, the Interpreter is positioned next to the main speaker and opposite the deaf person.  Try to position everyone so that sunshine and shadow does not fall on the Interpreter’s or the deaf person’s face.

Flipcharts, projectors etc   When using any resource material, bear in mind that the deaf person’s attention will be on the Interpreter, so allow a slight pause so they can view the required information.

Speaking   Always speak to the deaf person rather than to the Interpreter eg, “Do you have any questions?” rather than “Does he have any questions?”

Booking an Interpreter   There is some specialisation, so make sure you book the right interpreter for the job.  It is recommended that you book up to 8 weeks in advance.

For more information, go to www.hearfirst.org.uk

 

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